Wednesday, May 5, 2010

Mother's Day - Twitter Chats Blog Tour



Welcome to the Twitter Chats Blog Tour, organized by Anne Tyler Lord at Don’t Fence Me In and by yours truly. ;) Today's theme is Mother's Day.
You'll be traveling with us through the blogs of some of the fantastic authors and writers who participate in our weekly -- funny, entertaining and educating -- Twitter chats. This tour will feature writers from #writechat, #litchat, and #fridayflash.
You will be directed to your next stop at the end of this post. Please feel welcome here, and have a happy Mother's Day!
~~~~~~~
Where Is Mom
Where's mom?
She's not here dear, but she'll be back by night.
I want my mom.
I know honey...
Why she's never here? Doesn't she love me?
Of course she loves you!
Then why is she never here?
Because she's working...
Why?
Well, people have to work to buy food, clothes, to keep a house.
These things.
Why
does she
have to work?
Why don't you go so she can stay with me?
Well...
Humph.
Will you be my mom instead?
Oh no, pumpkin, I can be your friend if you want, but I'm not your mother.
I want mommy...
Come here sweetie. Lie down on my lap.
I'll tell you a nice story while we wait for her to come back.
A story?
What kind of story?
An adventure, with magic swords and all!
I love magic swords! Can I have a hot cocoa too?
This once, ok?
Ok.
~~~~~~~
Thanks for stopping by! Your next stop for the Mother's Day Twitter Chats Blog Tour is Jon Strother, at Mad Utopia, who is the creator of one of the most prolific and supportive Twitter Chats, #FridayFlash. If you are on Twitter, it's worth checking it out!

Below you'll find the complete list of participants, in order of appearance. Have fun! :)

>> Anne Tyler Lord of Don't Fence Me In (co-host of Twitter Chats Blog Tour)

>> Mari Juniper of mari's randomities (co-host of Twitter Chats Blog Tour)

>> Jon Strother of Mad Utopia (creator of #FridayFlash)

>> Carolyn Burns Bass of Ovations, and also at the Red Room writing community (creator of #LitChat)












Note: I found this gorgeous picture that we used for the tour here.

31 comments:

  1. Aw, that was a very sweet story about a situation that happens so many times everyday. There are so many great people "mothering" children when their mothers are working.

    Very clever to have a Mother's Day poem about a situation when a mother is not there.

    This also illustrates the power of stories.

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  2. The sad reality of life...and hard on the child. Great poem through the eyes of a child.
    Happy Mother's Day!

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  3. Nice! I could see the scene and hear the child. So many people go through these scenarios. Nicely done!

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  4. You've painted a detailed and wonderful picture with simple words, where all character are clear, including that of the mother who wants to be there!

    A lovely contrast to the complicated organizing job you've taken on with Anne, but I'm sure no less difficult! We all appreciate it, Kristi

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  5. You write in this voice so well. Very sweet story. It reminds me of a favorite auntie.

    Cool idea you, Anne, and the others are doing. An individual tribute to motherhood.

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  6. Thanks everyone! I was afraid this piece was too simple for our grand event, but I see you have understood my intention well.

    I wanted to bring a different perspective to the game, which I'm very happy you all joined. Happy Mother's Day! :)

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  7. Lovely Mari!
    Don't think for one second that this piece was too simple, it was so beautiful partly because of its simplicity, partly because of how this is a daily event in so many households.

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  8. --Estrella: Thank you! Whew, I'm relieved. :)

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  9. Spoken like a true caregiver and storyteller, Mariana. I only hope all the people who care for my children are as wonderful as your nanny character. When my mother ran a daycare, she was just like this -- kind and giving.
    Donna

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  10. You said so much with so few words here Mari. Proof that mothers are all around us too.

    Thank you, and Anne, for hosting this fun tour! Happy Mother's Day weekend!

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  11. very sweet! and shows what a big role in reassuring children a caregiver can play while mom (or dad) is away :)

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  12. --Donna: Thank you, this is some compliment! You were blessed to have such a kind mother. I'm sure the children under her care appreciated this as well. :)

    --Deanna: Thank *you* for participating! We're very happy to have you! :)

    --Angie (techtigger): Thanks! That was my main goal, considering the perspective thing I mentioned before. ;) Glad you liked it!

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  13. yes, great perspective indeed. loved it.

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  14. Life isn't always what it should be; you captured that very well.

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  15. --Annie: Thanks! I think "perspective" is one of my favorite words, heh. ;)

    --Tony: Thank you! It's sad, isn't it? I wouldn't bear, as a mother, to know that my kid has asked the nanny to replace me, even if it wasn't a serious question. Kids are strange honest little things, heh.

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  16. What a wonderful way to honor all who "mother" whether they've given birth to the children they care for or not.

    What a lovely, caring, reassuring person your caregiver is in this poem.

    Thank you, Mari-girl, for hosting such a wonderful event for us. :)

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  17. Mari, this was a very sweet poem and a lovely story about two different mother figures in this child's life. The actual mother is making the sacrifices she needs to, for the child's survival and future, and the caregiver is helping to nurture the child day by day. Very sweet and powerful. Thanks!

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  18. Mariana, who doesn't connect with the sweet innocence of your MC? So emotionally tender. Even more, I appreciate the artful use of poem prose to create a brief moment in time story arc. Great choice to turn the Mother's Day story on its side to show the caregiver as mother, even when the real mother must be doing her doggedest to provide. It shows the struggle of both parent and child so well. Big time kudos on this one, Mariana!

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  19. It's so hard for young children to understand the harsh realities of life. Mom is trying so hard. But the child will come to understand, in time.
    ~jon

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  20. --Marisa: Thanks Mari-girl, and thank you for participating with your wonderful piece. :)

    --Phyl and Debra: Thank you! Your comments are so warming!

    --Jon: It is. At least this child has a caring nanny and not an abusive one. Will be less hard for her, I think.

    Thanks for participating, and for stopping by to comment. :)

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  21. This gets weird quick once the same speaker goes on for more than one 'paragraph,' but a quick re-scan reorients the mind. By keeping everything so short and in obvious voices, though, you made that reorientation possible. Nice trick, Mariana.

    Possible typo in the fifth paragraph: "Why she's never here?" Maybe "Why's she never here?"

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  22. --John: Wow, you caught me in middle jump! I was visiting your blog, coming from Tony's, heh.

    You called my attention by your thoughtful comment on his Mother's Day piece. I appreciate and admire your honesty and help. Thank you for taking your time to come over here and share your thoughts on my piece. :)

    About the possible typo, you're right that it's a grammatical error. I had put it on purpose, since it's a small child speaking. But I accept your advice and in the future I'll choose the correct form you suggested. It's more elegant and conveys the same message. ;) THANK YOU.

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  23. This is such a sweet piece, mari! A nice ode to working moms and a reminder to me to count my blessings that I am able to stay at home.

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  24. Aww, cute. I love stories like this - all warm and snuggly. :)

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  25. --PJ: You're blessed indeed! It must be difficult to let the children in the hands of someone else, even if it's a kind caretaker as this one. Can't even imagine the other "types", uh.

    -Sam: Thanks! I like warm and snuggly too, heh. :)

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  26. Ahh, the pain of a kid recently dumped into day care. This is why I put my kids in as infants; they didn't know any differently. And by the time they were old enough to ask, we were almost done needing the extra help.

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  27. --Susan: It's a smart solution the one you found for your own kids. I'm sure they did just fine. :)

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  28. Oh for the stories that nurtured us when mothers, fathers, friends and lovers can't be with us. We became writers because of moments like this.

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  29. --Carolyn: What a beautiful thought! And it makes much sense. Thanks for sharing it. :)

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  30. Hi Mari. I gave you an award today on my blog: http://wp.me/pBmxU-dw :) I've never heard of #FridayFlash. Going to have to check it out this week.

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  31. --Amy: Ohhh, thank you so much for the award! I'll post it and spread the word asap. :D

    #FridayFlash is a growing community, which doesn't impede them of being *very* supportive and friendly. Many of the blogs on my blog roll are from #FridayFlash folks. This is my way of keeping a close eye on their stuff. ;)

    I'm sure you'll love it!

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